WORLD CHESS DAY.

World chess day in Mombasa

The International Chess Day is celebrated annually on July 20, the day the International Chess Federation(FIDE) was founded, in 1924. It is celebrated by many of the 605 million regular chess players around the world.

As proposed by UNESCO, the idea is to celebrate this day as the international chess day and it has been celebrated as such since 1966, after it was established by FIDE.

As recent as 2013, the international chess day was celebrated in 178 countries, according to FIDE President Kirsan IIlyumzhinov. FIDE, which has 181 chess federations as its members, organizes chess events and competitions around the world on this day. (Reference: “History of International Chess Day”)

 

Lighthouse Chess Club celebrated world chess day over the past weekend by visiting 3 institutions that are doing a wondrous job of helping the less fortunate in our society.

FIGURE 1: Kids at Sirio School playing chess.

Tumaini Childrens Home is an orphange in Mombasa that cares for children infected or affected by HIV. Tumaini Childrens Home are also the proprietors of Sirio school built on the same ground and where our focus was when we visited last Friday.

figure 2: Chess training in progress.

There about 30 kids who play chess regularly under the pupillage of Mr. Ken Machabe. Ken is one of the teachers who received the training of trainers in Mombasa last year and has shown deep commitment to training the kids of Sirio school. Some of these have won awards in past Lighthouse events and we will soon see masters growing from these enthusiastic group of kids. It therefore came as no surprise when Ken joined us to visit the other 2 institutions.

figure 3: Gideon, training kids at Sirio School.

Our next stop was Wema centre which is a rehabilitation centre for orphaned and abandoned street children. They have been in  operation from 1993 and have had a number of the kids being supported all the way to graduate from University. Their latest being 2 students from Moi University and Maseno University.

figure 4: Chess training in progress at Wema Centre.
figure 5: The children at Wema Centre were so inquisitive and Ken had to answer all their questions.
figure 6: : A chess lesson in progress at Wema Centre.

Our target audience for our visit on Saturday 21st July though was the junior students who are still in their primary school because we believe this is the source of the future chess champions. The kids, who are always overjoyed at receiving visitors, were excited to learn this new game of chess. Some had been exposed to it in the schools they went to but most of them were seeing a chess board for their first time. There were about 70 children in the hall with us when we made a presentation on chess and some learnt the rules very quickly and we will be sure to assist some of their caregivers to acquire the skills to be providing the chess training in Wema Centre.

figure 7: Chess class in progress at Wema Centre Children’s Home.

The third institution we visited on Sunday 22nd July was the Salvation Army Children’s home (SA)  in Mombasa. The Salvation Army is one of the oldest Churches in Kenya and most established in the world. They are known for their acts of charity to the less fortunate in the society by providing the basic needs of food, clothes and shelter to the needy.

figure 8: : Chess training in progress at Salvation Army.
Figure 9: Ken training kids at Salvation Army Children’s Home.

In Mombasa they run a children’s home which caters for homeless children and feeds about 50 children with ages ranging from 2 years to 15 years.

When we introduced chess to them on Sunday the joy they had at learning a new game gave us impetus to go back and donate boards on our next visit and provide free training in chess.

Figure 10: Chess class in progress at Salvation Army.
Figure 11: Joyce of Lighthouse Chess Club showing the Salvation Army kids how the pawn moves.

In Mombasa they run a children’s home which caters for homeless children and feeds about 50 children with ages ranging from 2 years to 15 years.

When we introduced chess to them on Sunday the joy they had at learning a new game gave us impetus to go back and donate boards on our next visit and provide free training in chess.

Comments (1)

This is very inspirational…
How does one become a member if you already know how to play the game?

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